How to Draw Old Cars

How to Draw Old Cars

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An old fashion car is one of the most enjoyable things to draw because of its beautiful and overstated shapes and appearance. For first timer, here are some basic steps on how to draw old cars.

When you draw, you would always draw the things that interest you. Many car lovers love to draw cars and some of them take time to know how to draw old cars. An old fashion car is one of the most enjoyable things to draw because of its beautiful and overstated shapes and appearance. Although, personally it looks complicated, yet old cars are easy to draw as long as you know the basic geometric shapes.

For first timer, here are some basic steps on how to draw old cars.

The first thing you need to do is to study every details of a classic car, whether in photograph, on the internet or in reality. Take notice on the main shapes and how these shapes come as one.

After learning the details of a classic car, now you will need your drawing paper and pencil to start your actual drawing. It’s better to use HB pencil when you draw. In your paper sketch a big rectangle, above it on the right half draw another rectangle with a partially slanted left end. And then above the second rectangle draw a very thin rectangle with slanted roof. You can make a windshield by drawing a slanted box, or by connecting the left ends of the second and third rectangle, make sure to form a box when you connect the left ends. On both end of the first rectangle, put a circle, these will serve as the wheels. Then draw an incomplete circle within the first rectangle to form the spare tire. Image
 
On the first step you draw the skeleton of the car, now it’s time to add some details to it. On the roof, add a curve line. Then add another circle inside the two wheels, and draw an incomplete circle within the spare tire. To form the running board and fenders, you need to add curve lines to the wheel along the base of the car.

The third step is the adding of hubcaps. On the wheels and spare tire, add two smaller circles. To form the front grille and roof support columns, use straight line and curved lines. The illustration below will show the details for doing these. Image
 
The fourth step is to add the doors. To make a door form, use curve and straight lines, then for the door handles draw tiny rectangles. To add more details for the spare tire, you can put four short erect lines on the front. Then for the bumper, put an upturned L-shaped form. Image
 
Then for the final touch, you will use your shading skills. On the top part of the body, put tiny curved lines to emphasize the upper pattern. Then on the bumper, used straight and curved lines to stress out and finish the bumper and also the trunk. To give emphasis to the tires, running board, trunk and side windows, you will need to darken the shading to these areas. It also laid emphasis if you draw straight lines below the shaded part of the side windows. Image
 
These are the simple steps on how to draw old cars. For first timer, you can always use the tracing technique; in this way you will be able to understand quickly every detail of an old car. Of course, you will do that not more than once, on the second attempt do it without tracing. Through constant practice and understanding the material you will be able to draw old cars easily.




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Anonymous   |:
So cool
Scott  - This will help me   |:
This will help me
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This will help me
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very good
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Wow, this is a very helpful illustration. Thank you
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